Monday, January 09, 2017

Losing weight and alcohol

Sometimes the analytical data does not match the scientific data. When it comes to health and fitness, this is so true so often. For example, so many times we are told that you should not drink alcohol, for one reason or another. It slows down your metabolism, and this effect may last up to 3 days. If your goal is to lose weight, you should cut out the drinking.




So, if that's true, then how the hell did I lose 30 pounds last year. Between January and April, 2016, I lost 25 pounds. At least one day a week I took a free day. On nearly every one of those free days I consumed alcoholic beverages. My beverage of choice was whiskey last year. I like whiskey and coke. On most of those occasions, I drank on average 3 drinks, or more.




Okay, so, if the theory that alcohol prevents weight loss, then how the hell did I drop 30 pounds.


Now, let's use this year as an example. On January 1 I weighed in at 207 pounds. I set a goal to lose 5 pounds on week one. On January 4, it was my birthday. I took a free day. That night I decided it's my birthday, and I can drink if I want to. So I did.




Today, January 8, was my weigh in. My goal was to weigh 202 today, right? Well, the verdict is in: I weight 202.4. That is pretty darn impressive. I did it despite eating an unlimited number of calories and alcoholic beverages on Wednesday.




Yay!!!!   If you go read my other blogs, I have given plenty of evidence to bash the science. I have proven that salt does not raise blood pressure, it actually lowers it. I have proven that running is not bad for your joints. I have proven that man-made global warming is a myth (try me on this one).  I have proven albuterol does not treat pneumonia and CHF. I have proven that taking extra puffs of albuterol does not kill... (speaking of this, I'm going to make this the topic for tomorrow's post). 




Anyway, I think if you quit doing the things you love to do, and you try to lose weight too fast, you are going to just crash on your diet. That's what I believe. I think that alcohol gets a bad name by the plight of a few who abuse it. I don't see any evidence that responsible drinking prevents weight loss. Sure, the numbers may say one thing, but the analytical data says otherwise.

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